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  • Date:22SundayOctober 2017

    Evolution and Engineering of Allosteric Regulation in Protein Kinases

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    Time
    10:00 - 11:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Orna Resnekov
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Allosteric regulation - the control of protein function by s...»
    Allosteric regulation - the control of protein function by sites far from the active
    site, is a common feature that enables dynamic cellular responses. Reversible post-translational
    modifications (such as phosphorylation) appear to be well suited to mediate dynamic cellular responses - yet
    how new allosteric regulation evolves is not understood.
    We mutationally scanned the surface of a prototypical kinase to identify readily evolvable phosphorylation
    sites. Our data reveal spatially distributed "hotspots" on the surface of the protein that coevolve with the
    active site and preferentially modulate kinase activity. By engineering simple consensus phosphorylation
    sites at these hotspots, we successfully re-wired in vivo cell signaling.
    Our results demonstrate a general strategy for engineering new cell signaling pathways, suggest cryptic sites for developing
    small molecule allosteric kinase inhibitors and also provide a context for interpreting kinase mutations involved in disease.
    Lecture
  • Date:22SundayOctober 2017

    "A stress-Induced Hidden Secret of the Genetic Code"

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    Time
    10:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Hanna Engelberg-Kulka
    Hadassah Medical School, The Hebrew University
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Lecture
  • Date:22SundayOctober 2017

    2017 Weizmann Memorial Lecture

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    Time
    15:00 - 16:30
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Gero Miesenböck
    Optogenetics: Lighting Up the Brain
    Contact
    Academic Events
  • Date:23MondayOctober 2017

    IMM Guest Seminar: Prof. Smita Krishnaswamy, from Yale school of Medicine, will lecture on "Manifold-Learning Frameworks for Extracting Structure from High-throughput Single-Cell Datasets", Monday Oct 23rd, 2017

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    Time
    10:00
    Location
    Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Smita Krishnaswamy
    Assistant Professor of Genetics and of Computer Science, Yale school of Medicine
    Organizer
    Department of Immunology
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Recent advances in single-cell technologies enable deep insi...»
    Recent advances in single-cell technologies enable deep insights into cellular development, gene regulation, and phenotypic diversity by measuring gene expression and epigenetics for thousands of single cells in a single experiment. While these technologies hold great potential for improving our understanding of cellular states and progression, they also pose new challenges in terms of scale, complexity, noise and measurement artifact which require advanced mathematical and algorithmic tools to extract underlying biological signals. In this talk, I cover one of most promising techniques to tackle these problems: manifold learning, and the related manifold assumption in data analysis. Manifold learning provides a powerful structure for algorithmic approaches to naturally process and the data, visualize the data and understand progressions as well as to find phenotypic diversity as well and infer patterns in it. I will cover two alternative approaches to manifold learning, diffusion-based and deep learning-based and show results in several projects including:1) MAGIC (Markov Affinity-based Graph Imputation of Cells): an algorithm for denoising and transcript recover of single cells applied to single-cell RNA sequencing data from the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer, 2) PHATE (Potential of Heat-diffusion Affinity-based Transition Embedding): a visualization technique that offers an alternative to tSNE in that it emphasizes progressions and branching structures rather than cluster separations shown on several datasets including a newly generated embryoid body differentiation dataset, and 3) SAUCIE (Sparse AutoEncoders for Clustering Imputation and Embedding): a novel auto encoder architecture that performs denoising, batch normalization, clustering and visualization simultaneously for massive single-cell data sets from multi-patient cohorts shown on mass cytometry data from Dengue patients.
    Lecture
  • Date:23MondayOctober 2017

    Life Science Colloquium

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Title
    Organizational principles of nervous system specification
    Location
    Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Oliver Hobert
    Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
    Organizer
    Life Sciences
    Contact
    Colloquia
  • Date:23MondayOctober 2017

    2017 Weizmann Memorial Lecture

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    Time
    15:00 - 16:30
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Gero Miesenböck
    Time to Decide
    Academic Events
  • Date:24TuesdayOctober 2017

    HESTPV Solar ERAnet October 2017 meeting

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    Michael and Anna Wix Auditorium
    Jean Goldwurm 3D Visualization Theater
    Chairperson
    David Cahen
    Homepage
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:24TuesdayOctober 2017

    Sewing the Original “Smart Fabrics”: Catalysts of Extracellular Matrix Assembly

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    Time
    10:00 - 11:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Deborah Fass
    Dept. of Structural Biology
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Abstract: Disulfide bonds are covalent cross-links that sta...»
    Abstract:
    Disulfide bonds are covalent cross-links that stabilize and regulate proteins. Disulfides are typically introduced into proteins as they fold in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and a great number of enzymes are present in the ER to help with this process. Despite the predominance of the ER as the site of disulfide cross-linking, an additional disulfide catalyst, called Quiescin Sulfhydryl Oxidase (QSOX), is found in the Golgi apparatus. We have investigated the function of QSOX in cultured cells and animals and have found that it participates in the formation of extracellular “smart fabrics” such as fibrous matrices and mucus. The structural and compositional complexity of these materials makes studying them on the biomolecular level a great challenge, but their enormous importance to cell and organismal biology inspire us to seek novel approaches.
    Bio:
    Deborah Fass received her scientific training at Harvard and MIT and came to Israel in 1998 to join the Department of Structural Biology. She has a background in molecular virology and protein folding. She became interested in disulfide bond formation by studying how virus envelope proteins manipulate endoplasmic reticulum chaperones to acquire “spring-loaded” conformations that prime them to penetrate new target cells. Over the past two decades, she has been continually surprised at how many interesting and unexpected biological processes are controlled by disulfide bond formation.
    Lecture
  • Date:24TuesdayOctober 2017

    Identification of a unique cell cycle regulator in Streptococcus pneumoniae by en masse GFP localization, Tn-seq and CRISPRi phenotyping

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Jan-Willem Veening
    University of Lausanne
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:24TuesdayOctober 2017

    On discovery in (photo-) catalysis

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:30
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Frank Glorius
    Organisch-Chemisches Institut der Westfälischen Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany
    Organizer
    Department of Organic Chemistry
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:24TuesdayOctober 2017

    Plant mitochondria group II introns splicing: A window into the evolution of the nuclear spliceosomal machineries

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    Time
    11:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Oren Ostersetzer-Biran
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, Edmond Safra Campus The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Givat Ram, Jerusalem
    Organizer
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:25WednesdayOctober 2017

    Triple-stage mass spectrometry unravels the heterogeneity of endogenous protein complexes

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    Time
    12:00 - 13:00
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Dr. Gili Ben-Nissan
    Organizer
    Faculty of Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:25WednesdayOctober 2017

    Two-Dimensional (2D) Transition Metal Carbides, Nitrides, and Carbonitrides (MXenes) as Electrode Materials for High-Performance Supercapacitors

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Tyler Mathis
    Dept. Material Science and Engineering, Drexel University, USA
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Two-Dimensional (2D) Transition Metal Carbides, Nitrides, an...»
    Two-Dimensional (2D) Transition Metal Carbides, Nitrides, and Carbonitrides (MXenes) as Electrode Materials for High-Performance Supercapacitors
    Lecture
  • Date:26ThursdayOctober 2017

    Interfacing Single Electron Spins with a Quantum Bus

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:15
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Jason Petta
    Princeton
    Organizer
    Faculty of Physics
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of 11:00 Coffee, Tea and more ...»
    11:00 Coffee, Tea and more
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Tremendous progress has been achieved in the coherent contro...»
    Tremendous progress has been achieved in the coherent control of single quantum states (single charges, phonons, photons, and spins). At the frontier of quantum information science are efforts to hybridize different quantum degrees of freedom. For example, by coupling a single photon to a single electron fundamental light-matter interactions may be examined at the single particle level to reveal exotic quantum effects, such as single atom lasing. Coherent coupling of spin and light, which has been the subject of many theoretical proposals over the past 20 years, could enable a quantum internet where highly coherent electron spins are used for quantum computing and single photons enable long-range spin-spin interactions. In this colloquium I will describe experiments where we couple a single spin in silicon to a single microwave frequency photon. The coupling mechanism is based on spin-charge hybridization in the presence of a large magnetic field gradient. Spin-photon coupling rates gs/2 > 10 MHz are achieved and vacuum Rabi splitting is observed in the cavity transmission, indicating single spin-photon strong coupling. These results open a direct path toward entangling single spins at a distance using microwave frequency photons.
    Colloquia
  • Date:26ThursdayOctober 2017

    Pelletron meetings - by invitation only

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    Time
    16:00 - 17:30
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:29SundayOctober 2017

    Pre-SAAC Symposium

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    Time
    08:30 - 13:30
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Organizer
    Life Sciences
    Lecture
  • Date:29SundayOctober 2017

    Magnetic Resonance Seminar

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    Time
    16:00
    Title
    Diffusion of Intracellular Metabolites: a Compartment Specific Probe for Microstructure and ‎Physiology
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Shlomo Alexander Science Lounge
    Lecturer
    Prof. Itamar Ronen
    Leiden University Medical Center
    Organizer
    Department of Chemical and Biological Physics
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Intracellular metabolites that give rise to quantifiable MR ...»
    Intracellular metabolites that give rise to quantifiable MR resonances are excellent structural probes for the intracellular space, and are oftentimes specific, or preferential enough to a certain cell type to provide information that is also cell-type specific. In the brain, N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and glutamate (Glu) are predominantly neuronal/axonal in nature, whereas soluble choline compounds (tCho), myo-inositol (mI) and glutamine (Gln) are predominantly glial. The diffusion properties of these metabolites, examined by diffusion weighted MR spectroscopy (DWS) exclusively reflect properties of the intracellular milieu, thus reflecting properties such as cytosolic viscosity, macromolecular crowding, tortuosity of the intracellular space, the integrity of the cytoskeleton and other intracellular structures, and in some cases – intracellular sub-compartmentation and exchange.

    The presentation will introduce the basic methodological concepts of DWS and the particular challenges of acquiring robust DWS for accurate estimation of metabolite diffusion properties. Subsequently, the unique ability of DWS to characterize cell-type specific structural and physiological features will be demonstrated, followed by several applications of DWS to discern cell-type specific intracellular damage in disease, especially in multiple sclerosis (MS) and in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE). Also discussed are the advantages and the challenges of performing DWS at ultrahigh field will follow, and the possibilities of combining DTI/DWI and DWS in a combined analysis framework aimed at better characterizing tissue microstructural properties in health and disease. The presentation will conclude with examples of the potential of DWS to monitor and quantify cellular energy metabolism, where enzymatic processes may affect the diffusion properties of metabolites involved in metabolism.
    Lecture
  • Date:30MondayOctober 201702ThursdayNovember 2017

    International Board SAAC Review

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    Academic Events
  • Date:30MondayOctober 2017

    Surface organometallic chemistry, a powerful tool to yield molecular supported species and calibrated nanoparticles: Applications in catalysis and microelectronics

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:30
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Dr. Chloé Thieuleux
    University of Lyon
    Organizer
    Department of Organic Chemistry
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:30MondayOctober 2017

    The clinical implications of leukemia evolution

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Title
    Cancer Research Club
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Dr. Liran Shlush
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a devastating disease with l...»
    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a devastating disease with less than 10% of elderly patients survive five years. While AML originates from stem cells which evolve over many years it presents acutely due to the expansion of more committed progenitors. Over the recent years we were able to identify the origins of AML relapse, and also to study AML years before it is diagnosed. We now can predict AML 6 years before diagnosis. Future studies will soon provide evidence whether early treatment will be beneficial.
    Lecture

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